Grand Scale Projects: Evolving Planet

Walkthrough video of Evolving Planet just before opening in March, 2006. My company (and I) were responsible for all printing. Only the base wall colors were there. We did the rest. Except for the priceless artifacts, of course!

Project: The Field Museum,
Evolving Planet (700+ pieces)

Involvement

My involvement in the Evolving Planet exhibit was through my employer Andres Imaging and Graphics where we produced all signage for several museum exhibits. We had a sales connection with the museum work. I liked the work so much because of the challenge. I was given the responsibilities of handling my schedule and our museum work including this project. this project, almost exclusively (on occasion I had to recruit help).

Responsibilities

I was the digital prepress specialist. I dealt very closely with our salesman and the client to It was my responsibility to take in the files and report back what was present. Before paperwork caught up, I would often move the job forward by preparing it for a multitude of presses and materials. All colors had to match across the entire exhibit and that was my job. I matched 72 individual PMS colors across 4 presses. It was the true meaning of “museum quality”.

Depth of Project

The project involved several rounds of client changes. It took 4 months of overtime to complete and frankly is the feather in my cap thus far in my career. It still wasn’t the largest exhibit we would do in cooperation with The Field Museum, but it was the first of its size at 700+ pieces. I was a bachelor when the project was completed and I walked my kids through it 12 years later. If I sound very proud of the accomplishment and the tangibility of the results as I see others enjoying it, I most certainly am.

So What Happened?

The result was that my confidence in my skills grew exponentially. I continued to get the most uncommon jobs we had including museum work. This particular installation at The Field Museum dinosaur collection remains to this day and is my tiny thumbprint, legacy, and contribution to the City of Chicago and its visitors.